Messianic Mythology and Passover

In the Messianic Jewish movement, great truths are being restored to the body of Messiah. However, the same movement is also generating an inordinate amount of balderdash. Balderdash (בלדרדש) is an English word of unknown origin meaning “nonsensical, foolish talk.” Let's learn to separate fact from fiction. Let's not be fooled.

This Is the Bread of Affliction

The introductory prayer to the seder is an invitation to all who are hungry and needy to eat of the bread of Passover. The Messiah identifies with the very same bread, and promises eternal satiation to all who partake. This invitation makes us recall the bold declaration of our Messiah: “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger”

We Were There

The Jewish people today are to see themselves as present with the people of Israel in ancient times. We were there for the Passover in Egypt, and we were there for the Messiah’s Passover in the land of Israel. And just as we were there that Passover, we were also there during that Shavu’ot that came fifty days later.

Thoughts from the Upper Room

In this age of historical revisionism some people want to believe that this schism was simply a debate about a day versus a date; but that is simply not true. The early church was rife with anti-Semitism and it deliberately chose to sever the connection between the celebration of Passover and Yeshua’s resurrection.

A New Moses for a New Exodus

Yeshua “fulfills” prophecy in Hosea in that events in his live recapitulate the exodus event. By evoking the larger context of Hosea 11:1 and by creating parallels between the life of Yeshua and story of Moses, Matthew presents Yeshua as a new Moses who leads the nation in a new exodus from Egypt.

Unleavened Bread and Unleavened Deeds

From Exodus 12:17 we learn the importance of being very careful not to allow dough intended for unleavened bread to become leavened. The same verse instructs us regarding how to please God with our actions.

A Greater Exodus

Jeremiah 16 seems to imply that the redemption that occurred during the Passover in Egypt will no longer be remembered. But will there really be a time when we will no longer tell the great tales of the exodus? If so, this conflicts with other Scriptures that indicate that we will tell of the exodus “all the days” of our lives.

A Jewish Celebration of Yeshua’s Resurrection

In Messianic Judaism, the resurrection of Yeshua is one of our most treasured truths. How can we give this foundational belief the attention it deserves and yet remain within thoroughly Jewish space? An ancient custom based on the life and death of King David could provide the perfect setting and unite us with the earliest Jewish followers of the Messiah.

Called by Name

While the Jewish people are promised redemption collectively as a nation, Gentile disciples have been handpicked by the Almighty for salvation. All Gentile disciples of the Master have been specifically called by name to participate in the past and future redemptions.

Let My People Go

The exodus from Egypt is the Bible's paradigm for what salvation looks like. The salvation from Egypt is the Torah's clearest picture of what salvation is and how it works. In those events, God was planting a seed, foreshadowing the Gospel, showing us how it is that He saves His people. The exodus story sets up the pattern.

Passover and the Death of James the Just

The most important detail we receive is that James’ death took place right before Passover. Although neither Jewish nor Church literature preserves an actual date for James’ death, it seems from Josephus’ and Eusebius’ information we may conclude that James was martyred in 62 CE during the week before Passover.

Shabbat HaGadol

Judaism considers the Festivals of Passover and Unleavened Bread as the prototype for the final redemption. The tradition of setting a place at the seder table for Elijah the prophet reflects the ardent belief that Messiah will bring redemption at Passover. As the anticipated herald of the Messiah, Elijah will need to be present as the festival begins.

A Taste of Freedom

For most of us, participation in a Passover Seder begins with readying our homes and congregational buildings, preparation for what we’ll be wearing and/or whether or not we’ve purchased our dinner tickets prior to the event, then ends with the seder. What more is there that requires devotional preparation?

Passover and Gentiles: A Universal Exodus

In the days of the apostles there were many God-fearing Gentiles who celebrated Passover along with the Jewish people. Even rabbinic literature made room for non-Jews at a seder. In the Second Temple Era, Gentiles were not permitted to eat the actual Pesach sacrifice, but they were allowed to participate in the rest of the meal.

Parashat HaChodesh: Transcending Time

A great freedom will come with the ultimate redemption. If time equates to freedom, then ultimate freedom will come in a world where time itself is an unlimited resource. The only way to achieve this is with eternal life, a life that transcends time. This is one reason why Shabbat is a “foretaste of the age to come.”

A Different Night: The Timing of the Seder

In Judaism, time flows like a rolling wave that loops back on itself even as it pushes forward. That means that instead of commemorating the redemption, we have a brief opportunity to re-live it. Instead of rehearsing a future event, we experience a foretaste of it.

How to Make Sure Your Passover Seder Is Biblical

The Bible talks about eating the Passover lamb sacrifice with unleavened bread and bitter herbs, but there are so many parts of the seder that it doesn’t seem to mention. How can we make sure our seder is truly biblical? Can we find the seder in the Bible at all?

The Red Heifer in the Epistle of Barnabas

In Temple times, the special reading of Numbers 19 reminded those in attendance at the synagogue that they needed to prepare for Passover. They needed to undergo the ritual purification with the ashes of the red heifer prior to Passover. Otherwise they would not be ritually fit to eat the Passover sacrifice.

The Sabbath of the Cow

In Temple times, the special reading of Numbers 19 reminded those in attendance at the synagogue that they needed to prepare for Passover. They needed to undergo the ritual purification with the ashes of the red heifer prior to Passover. Otherwise they would not be ritually fit to eat the Passover sacrifice.